Countering antivaccination attitudes

Zachary Horne, Derek Powell, John E. Hummel, Keith J. Holyoak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three times as many cases of measles were reported in the United States in 2014 as in 2013. The reemergence of measles has been linked to a dangerous trend: parents refusing vaccinations for their children. Efforts have been made to counter people's anti-vaccination attitudes by providing scientific evidence refuting vaccination myths, but these interventions have proven ineffective. This study shows that highlighting factual information about the dangers of communicable diseases can positively impact people's attitudes to vaccination. This method outperformed alternative interventions aimed at undercutting vaccination myths.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10321-10324
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume112
Issue number33
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 18 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vaccination
Measles
Communicable Diseases
Parents

Keywords

  • Attitude change
  • Belief revision
  • Science education
  • Vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Countering antivaccination attitudes. / Horne, Zachary; Powell, Derek; Hummel, John E.; Holyoak, Keith J.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 112, No. 33, 18.08.2015, p. 10321-10324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Horne, Zachary ; Powell, Derek ; Hummel, John E. ; Holyoak, Keith J. / Countering antivaccination attitudes. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2015 ; Vol. 112, No. 33. pp. 10321-10324.
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