Cortisol concentrations in the milk of rhesus monkey mothers are associated with confident temperament in sons, but not daughters

Erin C. Sullivan, Katherine Hinde, Sally P. Mendoza, John P. Capitanio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One pathway by which infant mammals gain information about their environment is through ingestion of milk. We assessed the relationship between stress-induced cortisol concentrations in milk, maternal and offspring plasma, and offspring temperament in rhesus monkeys. Milk was collected from mothers after a brief separation from their infants at 3-4 months postpartum, and blood was drawn at this time for both mothers and infants. Offspring temperament was measured at the end of a 25-hr assessment. Cortisol concentrations in milk were in a range comparable to those found in saliva, and were positively correlated with maternal plasma levels. Mothers of males had higher cortisol concentrations in milk than did mothers of females, and cortisol concentrations in maternal milk were related to a Confident temperament factor in sons, but not daughters. This study provides the first evidence that naturally occurring variation in endogenous glucocorticoid concentrations in milk are associated with infant temperament.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-104
Number of pages9
JournalDevelopmental Psychobiology
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Temperament
Macaca mulatta
Nuclear Family
Hydrocortisone
Milk
Mothers
Saliva
Postpartum Period
Glucocorticoids
Mammals
Eating

Keywords

  • Infant development
  • Lactation
  • Macaca mulatta
  • Maternal programming
  • Personality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Cortisol concentrations in the milk of rhesus monkey mothers are associated with confident temperament in sons, but not daughters. / Sullivan, Erin C.; Hinde, Katherine; Mendoza, Sally P.; Capitanio, John P.

In: Developmental Psychobiology, Vol. 53, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 96-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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