Corrigendum: Neighborhood disadvantage is associated with actigraphy-assessed sleep continuity and short sleep duration (Sleep DOI: 10.1093/sleep/zsy140)

Wendy M. Troxel, Amy Desantis, Andrea S. Richardson, Robin Beckman, Bonnie Ghosh-Dastidar, Alvin Nugroho, Lauren Hale, Daniel J. Buysse, Matthew Buman, Tamara Dubowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

A previously published version of this manuscript found a significant association between objective measurements of street lighting and neighborhood disorder and sleep outcomes; however, while preparing an unrelated paper, we determined that there was an error in the coding of objective measurements of street features (i.e. street lighting, disorder, and walkability). Specifically, the approach we used to derive person-level exposure variables from street segment-level observations of disorder, street lighting, and walkability inflated some of the neighborhood features. In accounting for different lengths of street segments, we scaled (or standardized) each street segment's length to one-tenth of a mile. However, we now have determined that this scaling inflated the values of segments shorter than one-tenth of a mile, while it minimized the values of street segments longer than one-tenth of a mile. That is, shorter street segments received a weight greater than 1 while longer street segments received a weight less than or equal to 1, leading to inaccurate upweighting of shorter street segments. Thus, our procedure led to a systematic bias in objectively coded neighborhood characteristics, and a misrepresentation of the underlying street- level features. The primary findings of this paper, specifically the significant associations between perceived safety and objectively measured crime, remain unchanged. However, the significant associations between street lighting and neighborhood disorder and sleep efficiency, wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO) and categorical measure of sleep duration were no longer significant, after correcting for this error in the objective measures of street lighting and neighborhood disorder. Corrected results are presented herein. The authors accept full responsibility for the data file processing miscalculations that led to the errors in the original publication of this manuscript, and sincerely regret any inconvenience this may have caused.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberzsy250
JournalSleep
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2019

Fingerprint

Actigraphy
Lighting
Sleep
Weights and Measures
Wakefulness
Information Storage and Retrieval
Crime
Publications
Emotions
corrigendum
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Troxel, W. M., Desantis, A., Richardson, A. S., Beckman, R., Ghosh-Dastidar, B., Nugroho, A., ... Dubowitz, T. (2019). Corrigendum: Neighborhood disadvantage is associated with actigraphy-assessed sleep continuity and short sleep duration (Sleep DOI: 10.1093/sleep/zsy140). Sleep, 42(3), [zsy250]. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsy250

Corrigendum : Neighborhood disadvantage is associated with actigraphy-assessed sleep continuity and short sleep duration (Sleep DOI: 10.1093/sleep/zsy140). / Troxel, Wendy M.; Desantis, Amy; Richardson, Andrea S.; Beckman, Robin; Ghosh-Dastidar, Bonnie; Nugroho, Alvin; Hale, Lauren; Buysse, Daniel J.; Buman, Matthew; Dubowitz, Tamara.

In: Sleep, Vol. 42, No. 3, zsy250, 19.03.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Troxel, WM, Desantis, A, Richardson, AS, Beckman, R, Ghosh-Dastidar, B, Nugroho, A, Hale, L, Buysse, DJ, Buman, M & Dubowitz, T 2019, 'Corrigendum: Neighborhood disadvantage is associated with actigraphy-assessed sleep continuity and short sleep duration (Sleep DOI: 10.1093/sleep/zsy140)' Sleep, vol. 42, no. 3, zsy250. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsy250
Troxel, Wendy M. ; Desantis, Amy ; Richardson, Andrea S. ; Beckman, Robin ; Ghosh-Dastidar, Bonnie ; Nugroho, Alvin ; Hale, Lauren ; Buysse, Daniel J. ; Buman, Matthew ; Dubowitz, Tamara. / Corrigendum : Neighborhood disadvantage is associated with actigraphy-assessed sleep continuity and short sleep duration (Sleep DOI: 10.1093/sleep/zsy140). In: Sleep. 2019 ; Vol. 42, No. 3.
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abstract = "A previously published version of this manuscript found a significant association between objective measurements of street lighting and neighborhood disorder and sleep outcomes; however, while preparing an unrelated paper, we determined that there was an error in the coding of objective measurements of street features (i.e. street lighting, disorder, and walkability). Specifically, the approach we used to derive person-level exposure variables from street segment-level observations of disorder, street lighting, and walkability inflated some of the neighborhood features. In accounting for different lengths of street segments, we scaled (or standardized) each street segment's length to one-tenth of a mile. However, we now have determined that this scaling inflated the values of segments shorter than one-tenth of a mile, while it minimized the values of street segments longer than one-tenth of a mile. That is, shorter street segments received a weight greater than 1 while longer street segments received a weight less than or equal to 1, leading to inaccurate upweighting of shorter street segments. Thus, our procedure led to a systematic bias in objectively coded neighborhood characteristics, and a misrepresentation of the underlying street- level features. The primary findings of this paper, specifically the significant associations between perceived safety and objectively measured crime, remain unchanged. However, the significant associations between street lighting and neighborhood disorder and sleep efficiency, wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO) and categorical measure of sleep duration were no longer significant, after correcting for this error in the objective measures of street lighting and neighborhood disorder. Corrected results are presented herein. The authors accept full responsibility for the data file processing miscalculations that led to the errors in the original publication of this manuscript, and sincerely regret any inconvenience this may have caused.",
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