Correlates of self-efficacy for physical activity in African American women

Elizabeth A. Fallon, Sara Wilcox, Barbara Ainsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the correlates of self-efficacy for physical activity in African American women. In bivariate analyses, self-efficacy was higher among women reporting fewer social role constraints, more positive perceptions of physically active women, more positive sense of community, better perceived health, and higher levels of physical activity. In a simultaneous multivariate model, more positive perceived health status (p = .001), higher physical activity level (p = .007), and lower social role constraint (p = .02) were independently associated with higher self-efficacy. Thus, physical activity interventions for African-American women should include strategies to decrease social role constraint and offer safe activities for women with health conditions hindering physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-62
Number of pages16
JournalWomen and Health
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
African Americans
self-efficacy
Exercise
Social Role
Health Status
Women's Health
health
health status
American
community

Keywords

  • African American health
  • Exercise
  • Physical activity
  • Self-efficacy
  • Women's health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Gender Studies

Cite this

Correlates of self-efficacy for physical activity in African American women. / Fallon, Elizabeth A.; Wilcox, Sara; Ainsworth, Barbara.

In: Women and Health, Vol. 41, No. 3, 2005, p. 47-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fallon, Elizabeth A. ; Wilcox, Sara ; Ainsworth, Barbara. / Correlates of self-efficacy for physical activity in African American women. In: Women and Health. 2005 ; Vol. 41, No. 3. pp. 47-62.
@article{c349ec6017d9446daf80b71ac7710dcf,
title = "Correlates of self-efficacy for physical activity in African American women",
abstract = "This study examined the correlates of self-efficacy for physical activity in African American women. In bivariate analyses, self-efficacy was higher among women reporting fewer social role constraints, more positive perceptions of physically active women, more positive sense of community, better perceived health, and higher levels of physical activity. In a simultaneous multivariate model, more positive perceived health status (p = .001), higher physical activity level (p = .007), and lower social role constraint (p = .02) were independently associated with higher self-efficacy. Thus, physical activity interventions for African-American women should include strategies to decrease social role constraint and offer safe activities for women with health conditions hindering physical activity.",
keywords = "African American health, Exercise, Physical activity, Self-efficacy, Women's health",
author = "Fallon, {Elizabeth A.} and Sara Wilcox and Barbara Ainsworth",
year = "2005",
doi = "10.1300/J013v41n03_03",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "47--62",
journal = "Women and Health",
issn = "0363-0242",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Correlates of self-efficacy for physical activity in African American women

AU - Fallon, Elizabeth A.

AU - Wilcox, Sara

AU - Ainsworth, Barbara

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - This study examined the correlates of self-efficacy for physical activity in African American women. In bivariate analyses, self-efficacy was higher among women reporting fewer social role constraints, more positive perceptions of physically active women, more positive sense of community, better perceived health, and higher levels of physical activity. In a simultaneous multivariate model, more positive perceived health status (p = .001), higher physical activity level (p = .007), and lower social role constraint (p = .02) were independently associated with higher self-efficacy. Thus, physical activity interventions for African-American women should include strategies to decrease social role constraint and offer safe activities for women with health conditions hindering physical activity.

AB - This study examined the correlates of self-efficacy for physical activity in African American women. In bivariate analyses, self-efficacy was higher among women reporting fewer social role constraints, more positive perceptions of physically active women, more positive sense of community, better perceived health, and higher levels of physical activity. In a simultaneous multivariate model, more positive perceived health status (p = .001), higher physical activity level (p = .007), and lower social role constraint (p = .02) were independently associated with higher self-efficacy. Thus, physical activity interventions for African-American women should include strategies to decrease social role constraint and offer safe activities for women with health conditions hindering physical activity.

KW - African American health

KW - Exercise

KW - Physical activity

KW - Self-efficacy

KW - Women's health

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=31344467872&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=31344467872&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1300/J013v41n03_03

DO - 10.1300/J013v41n03_03

M3 - Article

VL - 41

SP - 47

EP - 62

JO - Women and Health

JF - Women and Health

SN - 0363-0242

IS - 3

ER -