Corporations at a crossroads

How multilevel governance interactions shape participation and effort in private governance regimes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article argues that the interactions between firm agency in corporate management and the multilevel governance structures in which firms operate condition firms' participation and effort in private governance regimes. Empirically, I examine the Fortune Global 500 firms' decisions about participation and the extent of participation in the Carbon Disclosure Project during 2011–2015. Given firms' strategic considerations, the efficacy of corporate management structures and practices is conditioned by domestic regulatory and global regime contexts, and this efficacy varies across developed and developing countries. In developed countries, corporate, domestic, and global governance positively reinforce each other as drivers of private regulation on climate change. These governance levels are complements not substitutes. By contrast, the main drivers of participation and effort in developing countries are corporate management structures and practices, the stringency of domestic regulatory institutions, and their interactions. This article's results are robust to alternative specifications, including an alternative modeling approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGovernance
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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multi-level-governance
corporation
governance
firm
participation
interaction
driver
management
developing country
global governance
climate change
Multi-level governance
Private governance
Interaction
Participation
regime
regulation
Corporate management
Management structure
Management practices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Marketing

Cite this

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