Convergence of microclimate in residential landscapes across diverse cities in the United States

Sharon J. Hall, J. Learned, B. Ruddell, K. L. Larson, J. Cavender-Bares, N. Bettez, P. M. Groffman, J. M. Grove, J. B. Heffernan, S. E. Hobbie, J. L. Morse, C. Neill, K. C. Nelson, J. P M O’Neil-Dunne, L. Ogden, D. E. Pataki, W. D. Pearse, C. Polsky, R. Roy Chowdhury, M. K. Steele & 1 others T. L E Trammell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: The urban heat island (UHI) is a well-documented pattern of warming in cities relative to rural areas. Most UHI research utilizes remote sensing methods at large scales, or climate sensors in single cities surrounded by standardized land cover. Relatively few studies have explored continental-scale climatic patterns within common urban microenvironments such as residential landscapes that may affect human comfort. Objectives: We tested the urban homogenization hypothesis which states that structure and function in cities exhibit ecological “sameness” across diverse regions relative to the native ecosystems they replaced. Methods: We deployed portable micrometeorological sensors to compare air temperature and humidity in residential yards and native landscapes across six U.S. cities that span a range of climates (Phoenix, AZ; Los Angeles, CA; Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN; Boston, MA; Baltimore, MD; and Miami, FL). Results: Microclimate in residential ecosystems was more similar among cities than among native ecosystems, particularly during the calm morning hours. Maximum regional actual evapotranspiration (AET) was related to the morning residential microclimate effect. Residential yards in cities with maximum AET

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalLandscape Ecology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 22 2015

Fingerprint

microclimate
heat
climate
rural area
heat island
air
evapotranspiration
ecosystem
sensor
city
humidity
land cover
air temperature
warming
remote sensing

Keywords

  • Humidity
  • Microclimate
  • Residential lawn
  • Urban heat island (UHI)
  • Urban homogenization
  • Urban protected area

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Ecology
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

Convergence of microclimate in residential landscapes across diverse cities in the United States. / Hall, Sharon J.; Learned, J.; Ruddell, B.; Larson, K. L.; Cavender-Bares, J.; Bettez, N.; Groffman, P. M.; Grove, J. M.; Heffernan, J. B.; Hobbie, S. E.; Morse, J. L.; Neill, C.; Nelson, K. C.; O’Neil-Dunne, J. P M; Ogden, L.; Pataki, D. E.; Pearse, W. D.; Polsky, C.; Chowdhury, R. Roy; Steele, M. K.; Trammell, T. L E.

In: Landscape Ecology, 22.10.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hall, SJ, Learned, J, Ruddell, B, Larson, KL, Cavender-Bares, J, Bettez, N, Groffman, PM, Grove, JM, Heffernan, JB, Hobbie, SE, Morse, JL, Neill, C, Nelson, KC, O’Neil-Dunne, JPM, Ogden, L, Pataki, DE, Pearse, WD, Polsky, C, Chowdhury, RR, Steele, MK & Trammell, TLE 2015, 'Convergence of microclimate in residential landscapes across diverse cities in the United States', Landscape Ecology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-015-0297-y
Hall, Sharon J. ; Learned, J. ; Ruddell, B. ; Larson, K. L. ; Cavender-Bares, J. ; Bettez, N. ; Groffman, P. M. ; Grove, J. M. ; Heffernan, J. B. ; Hobbie, S. E. ; Morse, J. L. ; Neill, C. ; Nelson, K. C. ; O’Neil-Dunne, J. P M ; Ogden, L. ; Pataki, D. E. ; Pearse, W. D. ; Polsky, C. ; Chowdhury, R. Roy ; Steele, M. K. ; Trammell, T. L E. / Convergence of microclimate in residential landscapes across diverse cities in the United States. In: Landscape Ecology. 2015.
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AU - Cavender-Bares, J.

AU - Bettez, N.

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AU - Ogden, L.

AU - Pataki, D. E.

AU - Pearse, W. D.

AU - Polsky, C.

AU - Chowdhury, R. Roy

AU - Steele, M. K.

AU - Trammell, T. L E

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N2 - Context: The urban heat island (UHI) is a well-documented pattern of warming in cities relative to rural areas. Most UHI research utilizes remote sensing methods at large scales, or climate sensors in single cities surrounded by standardized land cover. Relatively few studies have explored continental-scale climatic patterns within common urban microenvironments such as residential landscapes that may affect human comfort. Objectives: We tested the urban homogenization hypothesis which states that structure and function in cities exhibit ecological “sameness” across diverse regions relative to the native ecosystems they replaced. Methods: We deployed portable micrometeorological sensors to compare air temperature and humidity in residential yards and native landscapes across six U.S. cities that span a range of climates (Phoenix, AZ; Los Angeles, CA; Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN; Boston, MA; Baltimore, MD; and Miami, FL). Results: Microclimate in residential ecosystems was more similar among cities than among native ecosystems, particularly during the calm morning hours. Maximum regional actual evapotranspiration (AET) was related to the morning residential microclimate effect. Residential yards in cities with maximum AET

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