Convergence in feeling, divergence in physiology

How culture influences the consequences of disgust suppression and amplification among European Americans and Asian Americans

José A. Soto, Elizabeth A. Lee, Nicole Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Much empirical work documents the downsides of suppressing emotions. Emerging research points to the need for a more sophisticated and culturally informed approach to understanding the consequences of emotion regulation. To that end, we employed behavioral, self-report, and psychophysiological measures to examine the consequences of two types of emotion regulation (suppression and amplification) in a sample of 28 Asian Americans and 31 European Americans. Participants were shown a neutral film and then a series of disgust-eliciting films during which they were asked to regulate their response by suppressing or amplifying their emotional behavior (counterbalanced). Despite self-reporting equal levels of disgust, European Americans showed greater skin conductance reactivity than Asian Americans in both regulation conditions, but not in response to a neutral film. These findings extend work on divergence in the consequences of emotion regulation across different cultural groups, which could help identify optimal emotion regulation strategies for health and well-being.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-51
Number of pages11
JournalPsychophysiology
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Asian Americans
Emotions
Self Report
Emotion Regulation
Divergence
Amplification
Disgust
Physiology
Suppression
Skin
Health
Research
Emotion

Keywords

  • Amplification
  • Asian Americans
  • Cultural differences
  • Emotion regulation
  • Psychophysiology
  • Suppression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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