Convergence and nonconvergence in the quality of adolescent relationships and its association with adolescent adjustment and young-adult relationship quality

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

With the aim of identifying and examining both convergence (matched relationship quality across one's set of relationships) and nonconvergence (mixed relationship quality across one's set of relationships), the present study used a pattern-centered approach to examine the different ways adolescent relationships pattern together among a large, national sample of U.S. adolescents (aged 13-19). The study also examined how adolescent adjustment and young-adult relationship quality varied across the different relationship patterns or constellations. The current study used latent class analysis and data from Add Health (n = 4,233), a national U.S. longitudinal study that spans adolescence and young adulthood, to uncover heterogeneity in adolescent relations with parents, friends, romantic partners, peers, and teachers. As predicted, patterns of both convergence and nonconvergence were found, though patterns of nonconvergence were more common than expected. Some patterns of nonconvergence appear more stable (i.e., similar pattern found during both adolescence and young adulthood) than others. Also, no "high" converging pattern was found, indicating that few adolescents have "first-rate" relations in every relational domain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)497-506
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Development
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

Keywords

  • adolescent development
  • latent class analysis
  • relationship quality
  • social capital

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Convergence and nonconvergence in the quality of adolescent relationships and its association with adolescent adjustment and young-adult relationship quality'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this