Controlling police decisions to use deadly force

Reexamining the importance of administrative policy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prior research has sought to identify appropriate mechanisms that can effectively control police officers' decisions to use deadly force. Using data from Philadelphia for a period of more than two decades, this article employs interrupted time series analysis (ARIMA) to examine the impact of two changes in administrative policy on monthly levels of deadly force in Philadelphia. Findings support prior deadly force research suggesting that administrative policy can be an effective deadly force discretion control, but the Philadelphia experience indicates that formal policy can be outweighed by the personal philosophies and policies of the chief, and that its impact is limited to elective encounters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-151
Number of pages21
JournalCrime and Delinquency
Volume47
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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administrative policy
Police
police
time series analysis
police officer
Research
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philosophy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Controlling police decisions to use deadly force : Reexamining the importance of administrative policy. / White, Michael.

In: Crime and Delinquency, Vol. 47, No. 1, 2001, p. 131-151.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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