Control, Motivation, Affect, and Strategic Self-Regulation in the College Classroom

A Multidimensional Phenomenon

Duane F. Shell, Jenefer Husman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study of 397 undergraduate students examined relations between self-reported control, goal orientation, future time perspective, affect, and strategic self-regulation. Five patterns were found in three canonical dimensions. The high end of bipolar Dimension 1 linked high self-regulated strategy use and study effort to high self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and effort causal attribution; high mastery and performance approach and low work avoidance goal orientations; and positive affect. The low end of Dimension 1 linked low strategy use and effort to low self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and effort causal attribution; high work avoidance goal orientation; and low affect. The high end of bipolar Dimension 2 linked knowledge-building strategies, but not active self-regulation or study effort, to high self-efficacy, outcome expectancy for learning but not grades, and affect causal attribution; high mastery goal orientation; and positive affect. The low end of Dimension 2 linked surface learning, consisting of active self-regulation and study effort but not personal knowledge building, to high effort causal attribution but low self-efficacy and outcome expectancy. Unipolar Dimension 3 linked learned helplessness to high outcome expectancy and external causal attribution but low self-efficacy; high work avoidance goal orientation; and high negative affect and anxiety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)443-459
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume100
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
self-regulation
attribution
self-efficacy
Motivation
classroom
self-study
Learned Helplessness
Problem-Based Learning
self-control
learning
Anxiety
Self-Control
Learning
Students
anxiety
performance
student

Keywords

  • affect
  • control beliefs
  • motivation
  • self-regulation
  • strategic learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Control, Motivation, Affect, and Strategic Self-Regulation in the College Classroom : A Multidimensional Phenomenon. / Shell, Duane F.; Husman, Jenefer.

In: Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol. 100, No. 2, 05.2008, p. 443-459.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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