Control Balance Behind Bars: Testing the Generality of Tittle’s Theory Among Incarcerated Men and Women

Kathleen Talbot, Matt R. Nobles, Jodi Lane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study contributes to the small, but growing, body of literature testing Tittle’s control balance theory by offering a unique test of the theory’s ability to explain a wide variety of offending among a large sample of recently incarcerated jail inmates. Among the full sample of inmates, both control deficits and surpluses significantly increase the risk of offending. When men and women are examined separately, control deficits are non-significant while control surpluses continue to increase offending, and this effect does not significantly vary among men and women. Evidence from the interactive effects of control imbalance and self-control indicate that control surpluses and low self-control are also related to committing a wider variety of crimes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)925-953
Number of pages29
JournalCrime and Delinquency
Volume62
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Crime
self-control
deficit
balance theory
control theory
offense
ability
evidence

Keywords

  • control balance theory
  • gender
  • jail inmates
  • offending variety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Cite this

Control Balance Behind Bars : Testing the Generality of Tittle’s Theory Among Incarcerated Men and Women. / Talbot, Kathleen; Nobles, Matt R.; Lane, Jodi.

In: Crime and Delinquency, Vol. 62, No. 7, 01.07.2016, p. 925-953.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b9d54e2683534282801d2bd185d1c677,
title = "Control Balance Behind Bars: Testing the Generality of Tittle’s Theory Among Incarcerated Men and Women",
abstract = "The current study contributes to the small, but growing, body of literature testing Tittle’s control balance theory by offering a unique test of the theory’s ability to explain a wide variety of offending among a large sample of recently incarcerated jail inmates. Among the full sample of inmates, both control deficits and surpluses significantly increase the risk of offending. When men and women are examined separately, control deficits are non-significant while control surpluses continue to increase offending, and this effect does not significantly vary among men and women. Evidence from the interactive effects of control imbalance and self-control indicate that control surpluses and low self-control are also related to committing a wider variety of crimes.",
keywords = "control balance theory, gender, jail inmates, offending variety",
author = "Kathleen Talbot and Nobles, {Matt R.} and Jodi Lane",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0011128714551407",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "62",
pages = "925--953",
journal = "Crime and Delinquency",
issn = "0011-1287",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Control Balance Behind Bars

T2 - Testing the Generality of Tittle’s Theory Among Incarcerated Men and Women

AU - Talbot, Kathleen

AU - Nobles, Matt R.

AU - Lane, Jodi

PY - 2016/7/1

Y1 - 2016/7/1

N2 - The current study contributes to the small, but growing, body of literature testing Tittle’s control balance theory by offering a unique test of the theory’s ability to explain a wide variety of offending among a large sample of recently incarcerated jail inmates. Among the full sample of inmates, both control deficits and surpluses significantly increase the risk of offending. When men and women are examined separately, control deficits are non-significant while control surpluses continue to increase offending, and this effect does not significantly vary among men and women. Evidence from the interactive effects of control imbalance and self-control indicate that control surpluses and low self-control are also related to committing a wider variety of crimes.

AB - The current study contributes to the small, but growing, body of literature testing Tittle’s control balance theory by offering a unique test of the theory’s ability to explain a wide variety of offending among a large sample of recently incarcerated jail inmates. Among the full sample of inmates, both control deficits and surpluses significantly increase the risk of offending. When men and women are examined separately, control deficits are non-significant while control surpluses continue to increase offending, and this effect does not significantly vary among men and women. Evidence from the interactive effects of control imbalance and self-control indicate that control surpluses and low self-control are also related to committing a wider variety of crimes.

KW - control balance theory

KW - gender

KW - jail inmates

KW - offending variety

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84979071825&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84979071825&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0011128714551407

DO - 10.1177/0011128714551407

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84979071825

VL - 62

SP - 925

EP - 953

JO - Crime and Delinquency

JF - Crime and Delinquency

SN - 0011-1287

IS - 7

ER -