Contribution of spelling instruction to the spelling, writing, and reading of poor spellers

Stephen Graham, Karen Harris, Barbara Fink Chorzempa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

136 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The contribution of supplemental spelling instruction to spelling, writing, and reading was examined. Second-grade children experiencing difficulties learning to spell participated in 48 20-min sessions designed to improve their spelling skills. In comparison with peers in a contact control condition receiving mathematics instruction, students in the spelling condition made greater improvements on norm-referenced spelling measures, a writing-fluency test, and a reading word-attack measure following instruction. Six months later, students in the spelling treatment maintained their advantage in spelling but not on the writing-fluency and reading word-attack measures. However, spelling instruction had a positive effect at maintenance on the reading word-recognition skills of children who scored lowest on this measure at pretest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)669-686
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume94
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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learning disorder
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Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Contribution of spelling instruction to the spelling, writing, and reading of poor spellers. / Graham, Stephen; Harris, Karen; Chorzempa, Barbara Fink.

In: Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol. 94, No. 4, 01.01.2002, p. 669-686.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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