Contraception and abortion in a low-fertility setting

The role of seasonal migration

Arusyak Sevoyan, Victor Agadjanian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

CONTEXT: Seasonal labor migration is common among men in many former Soviet republics. Little research has examined contraceptive use and induced abortion among women in such low-fertility, high-migration settings, according to husband's migration status. METHODS: Combined data from 2,280 respondents of two surveys of married women aged 18-45 in rural Armenia-one conducted in 2005 and one in 2007-were used. Logistic regression analyses examined whether a husband's migration status was associated with his wife's current use of the pill or the IUD, or with the probability that she had had a pregnancy that ended in induced abortion. Additional analyses were conducted to determine whether relationships were moderated by household wealth. RESULTS: Women with a migrant husband were less likely than those with a nonmigrant husband to be currently using the pill or the IUD (odds ratio, 0.6); with increased household wealth, the likelihood of method use increased among women with a nonmigrant husband, but decreased slightly among women with a migrant husband. Overall, the probability that a pregnancy ended in abortion did not differ by migration status; however, the likelihood of abortion increased with wealth among women married to a nonmigrant, but not among those married to a migrant. CONCLUSIONS: Despite their husband's absence, women married to a migrant may have an unwanted pregnancy rate similar to that of women married to a nonmigrant. Improved access to modern contraceptive methods is likely to be positively associated with contraceptive use among women with a nonmigrant husband, but not among those with a migrant husband.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)124-132
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

Fingerprint

contraception
Contraception
Spouses
abortion
husband
Fertility
fertility
migration
wife
migrant
pregnancy
contraceptive
contraceptive use
Induced Abortion
Contraceptive Agents
Armenia
woman
seasonal migration
labor migration
Unwanted Pregnancies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Demography
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Contraception and abortion in a low-fertility setting : The role of seasonal migration. / Sevoyan, Arusyak; Agadjanian, Victor.

In: International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, Vol. 39, No. 3, 09.2013, p. 124-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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