Continuity in critical network infrastructures: Accounting for nodal disruptions

Anthony Grubesic, Alan T. Murray, Jessica N. Mefford

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since the attacks of September 11 2001, there has been a renewed interest in identifying, protecting and maintaining the functionality of critical infrastructure systems in the United States and abroad. However, because these systems are relatively complex, many difficulties have emerged when attempting to differentiate between elements of the infrastructure that are “critical” and those that are not. In an effort to resolve this issue, the U.S. government has released several important reports detailing the specific infrastructures and assets considered critical to national security, governance, public health, and the economy (White House 2003). Table 10.1 displays the key sectors and assets outlined in the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets (Strategy).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Spatial Science
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages197-220
Number of pages24
Edition9783540680550
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameAdvances in Spatial Science
Number9783540680550
ISSN (Print)1430-9602
ISSN (Electronic)2197-9375

Fingerprint

continuity
infrastructure
assets
national strategy
national security
September 11, 2001
functionality
public health
governance
economy
Continuity
Assets
Disruption
Critical infrastructure
Attack
Government
Governance
Functionality
September 11 attacks
Key sectors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Grubesic, A., Murray, A. T., & Mefford, J. N. (2007). Continuity in critical network infrastructures: Accounting for nodal disruptions. In Advances in Spatial Science (9783540680550 ed., pp. 197-220). (Advances in Spatial Science; No. 9783540680550). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-68056-7_10

Continuity in critical network infrastructures : Accounting for nodal disruptions. / Grubesic, Anthony; Murray, Alan T.; Mefford, Jessica N.

Advances in Spatial Science. 9783540680550. ed. Springer International Publishing, 2007. p. 197-220 (Advances in Spatial Science; No. 9783540680550).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Grubesic, A, Murray, AT & Mefford, JN 2007, Continuity in critical network infrastructures: Accounting for nodal disruptions. in Advances in Spatial Science. 9783540680550 edn, Advances in Spatial Science, no. 9783540680550, Springer International Publishing, pp. 197-220. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-68056-7_10
Grubesic A, Murray AT, Mefford JN. Continuity in critical network infrastructures: Accounting for nodal disruptions. In Advances in Spatial Science. 9783540680550 ed. Springer International Publishing. 2007. p. 197-220. (Advances in Spatial Science; 9783540680550). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-68056-7_10
Grubesic, Anthony ; Murray, Alan T. ; Mefford, Jessica N. / Continuity in critical network infrastructures : Accounting for nodal disruptions. Advances in Spatial Science. 9783540680550. ed. Springer International Publishing, 2007. pp. 197-220 (Advances in Spatial Science; 9783540680550).
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