Constitution as executive order The administrative state and the political ontology of "we the people"

Thomas J. Catlaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article offers a new strategy for examining the legitimacy question in public administration and representative government. A genealogy of political discourses is proposed to suggest that political forms have historically relied on a constitutive exclusion. The U.S. Constitution and administrative state are conceived of as events in this genealogy but are unique in that both deny the analogically constitutive effect of the exclusion. Administration and constitutionalism are described as liberal political technologies, deployed to re-present and fabricate "the People," that is, to bring into reality the organic totality that is analogically presupposed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-482
Number of pages38
JournalAdministration and Society
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005

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genealogy
ontology
constitution
exclusion
totality
constitutionalism
public administration
legitimacy
event
discourse
present
Constitution
Ontology
Exclusion
Genealogy

Keywords

  • Biopolitics
  • History, public administration
  • Legitimacy
  • Representation
  • Sovereignty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Marketing

Cite this

Constitution as executive order The administrative state and the political ontology of "we the people". / Catlaw, Thomas J.

In: Administration and Society, Vol. 37, No. 4, 09.2005, p. 445-482.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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