Constancy and Change in the Prevalence and Frequency of Offending When Based on Longitudinal Self-reports or Official Records

Comparisons by Gender, Race, and Crime Type

Rolf Loeber, David P. Farrington, Alison E. Hipwell, Stephanie D. Stepp, Dustin Pardini, Lia Ahonen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The study examines age-crime prevalence and age-crime frequency curves based on longitudinal data from boys in the Pittsburgh Youth Study and girls in the Pittsburgh Girls Study. Results: Results show that the prevalence of the age-crime curve for theft and violence (based on self-reports or police charges) followed the typical age-crime curve for males and slightly less distinctly for females, with the peak of offending occurring earlier for self-reports than for police charges. The decrease in police charges for violence and theft took place at an earlier age for females than males, but this was not distinct when self-reported delinquency was the criterion. The mean frequency of self-reported theft and violence followed the age-crime curve for males but not for females, who showed a mean frequency of offending which was more constant. In contrast, the mean frequency of police charges increased with age for males and females. Comparing African-American and Caucasian males and females shows a higher prevalence but not a higher mean frequency of self-reported offending. Conclusions: The results are reviewed in the light of other studies, and the policy implications of the findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-168
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Fingerprint

Crime
Self Report
Police
Theft
offense
Violence
gender
larceny
police
violence
African Americans
delinquency
Caucasian

Keywords

  • Age crime curve
  • Delinquency
  • Frequency
  • Police charges
  • Prevalence
  • Race
  • Self-reports
  • Theft
  • Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Constancy and Change in the Prevalence and Frequency of Offending When Based on Longitudinal Self-reports or Official Records : Comparisons by Gender, Race, and Crime Type. / Loeber, Rolf; Farrington, David P.; Hipwell, Alison E.; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Pardini, Dustin; Ahonen, Lia.

In: Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology, Vol. 1, No. 2, 01.06.2015, p. 150-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{666d5c0af94b4bc5a76757d9935961d8,
title = "Constancy and Change in the Prevalence and Frequency of Offending When Based on Longitudinal Self-reports or Official Records: Comparisons by Gender, Race, and Crime Type",
abstract = "Introduction: The study examines age-crime prevalence and age-crime frequency curves based on longitudinal data from boys in the Pittsburgh Youth Study and girls in the Pittsburgh Girls Study. Results: Results show that the prevalence of the age-crime curve for theft and violence (based on self-reports or police charges) followed the typical age-crime curve for males and slightly less distinctly for females, with the peak of offending occurring earlier for self-reports than for police charges. The decrease in police charges for violence and theft took place at an earlier age for females than males, but this was not distinct when self-reported delinquency was the criterion. The mean frequency of self-reported theft and violence followed the age-crime curve for males but not for females, who showed a mean frequency of offending which was more constant. In contrast, the mean frequency of police charges increased with age for males and females. Comparing African-American and Caucasian males and females shows a higher prevalence but not a higher mean frequency of self-reported offending. Conclusions: The results are reviewed in the light of other studies, and the policy implications of the findings are discussed.",
keywords = "Age crime curve, Delinquency, Frequency, Police charges, Prevalence, Race, Self-reports, Theft, Violence",
author = "Rolf Loeber and Farrington, {David P.} and Hipwell, {Alison E.} and Stepp, {Stephanie D.} and Dustin Pardini and Lia Ahonen",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s40865-015-0010-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "1",
pages = "150--168",
journal = "Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology",
issn = "2199-4641",
publisher = "Springer International Publishing AG",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Constancy and Change in the Prevalence and Frequency of Offending When Based on Longitudinal Self-reports or Official Records

T2 - Comparisons by Gender, Race, and Crime Type

AU - Loeber, Rolf

AU - Farrington, David P.

AU - Hipwell, Alison E.

AU - Stepp, Stephanie D.

AU - Pardini, Dustin

AU - Ahonen, Lia

PY - 2015/6/1

Y1 - 2015/6/1

N2 - Introduction: The study examines age-crime prevalence and age-crime frequency curves based on longitudinal data from boys in the Pittsburgh Youth Study and girls in the Pittsburgh Girls Study. Results: Results show that the prevalence of the age-crime curve for theft and violence (based on self-reports or police charges) followed the typical age-crime curve for males and slightly less distinctly for females, with the peak of offending occurring earlier for self-reports than for police charges. The decrease in police charges for violence and theft took place at an earlier age for females than males, but this was not distinct when self-reported delinquency was the criterion. The mean frequency of self-reported theft and violence followed the age-crime curve for males but not for females, who showed a mean frequency of offending which was more constant. In contrast, the mean frequency of police charges increased with age for males and females. Comparing African-American and Caucasian males and females shows a higher prevalence but not a higher mean frequency of self-reported offending. Conclusions: The results are reviewed in the light of other studies, and the policy implications of the findings are discussed.

AB - Introduction: The study examines age-crime prevalence and age-crime frequency curves based on longitudinal data from boys in the Pittsburgh Youth Study and girls in the Pittsburgh Girls Study. Results: Results show that the prevalence of the age-crime curve for theft and violence (based on self-reports or police charges) followed the typical age-crime curve for males and slightly less distinctly for females, with the peak of offending occurring earlier for self-reports than for police charges. The decrease in police charges for violence and theft took place at an earlier age for females than males, but this was not distinct when self-reported delinquency was the criterion. The mean frequency of self-reported theft and violence followed the age-crime curve for males but not for females, who showed a mean frequency of offending which was more constant. In contrast, the mean frequency of police charges increased with age for males and females. Comparing African-American and Caucasian males and females shows a higher prevalence but not a higher mean frequency of self-reported offending. Conclusions: The results are reviewed in the light of other studies, and the policy implications of the findings are discussed.

KW - Age crime curve

KW - Delinquency

KW - Frequency

KW - Police charges

KW - Prevalence

KW - Race

KW - Self-reports

KW - Theft

KW - Violence

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85003640186&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85003640186&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s40865-015-0010-5

DO - 10.1007/s40865-015-0010-5

M3 - Article

VL - 1

SP - 150

EP - 168

JO - Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology

JF - Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology

SN - 2199-4641

IS - 2

ER -