Consistent Honor, Persistent Disadvantage: American Indian and Alaska Native Veteran Health in the National Survey of Veterans

Kimberly R. Huyser, Sofia Locklear, Connor Sheehan, Brenda L. Moore, John S. Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To examine self-rated health and activities of daily living (ADLs) limitations among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) veterans relative to white veterans. Methods: We use the 2010 National Survey of Veterans and limit the sample to veterans who identify as AI/AN or non-Hispanic white. We calculated descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, and used logistic regression. Results: AI/AN veterans are younger, have lower levels of income, and have higher levels of exposure to combat and environmental hazards compared to white veterans. We found that AI/AN veterans are significantly more likely to report fair/poor health controlling for socioeconomic status and experience an ADL controlling for age, health behaviors, socioeconomic status, and military factors. Discussion: The results indicate that AI/AN veterans are a disadvantaged population in terms of their health and disability compared to white veterans. AI/AN veterans may require additional support from family members and/or Veteran Affairs to address ADLs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68S-81S
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume33
Issue number7-8_suppl
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • activities of daily living limitations
  • American Indian and Alaska Native peoples
  • self-rated health
  • veterans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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