Conserving genetically distinctive populations: the case of the Huachuca tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum stebbinsi Lowe)

James Collins, T. R. Jones, H. J. Berna

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Huachuca tiger salamanders are a genetically distinctive race found only in 17 localities in the San Rafael Valley, SE Arizona. Populations of salamanders are threatened by introduction of exotic fishes and disease. An additional threat includes possible hybridization and introgression of populations resulting from introduction of exotic salamanders. Introduced bullfrogs Rana catesbeiana may also prey on salamanders, or act as vectors for disease. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGeneral Technical Report - US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service
Pages45-53
Number of pages9
EditionRM-166
StatePublished - 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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    Collins, J., Jones, T. R., & Berna, H. J. (1988). Conserving genetically distinctive populations: the case of the Huachuca tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum stebbinsi Lowe). In General Technical Report - US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (RM-166 ed., pp. 45-53)