Abstract

Radiological images constitute a special class of images that are captured (or computed) for a specific purpose (i.e. diagnosis) and their "correct" interpretation is vitally important. However, because they are not "natural " images, radiologists must be trained to visually interpret them. This training involves perceptual learning that is gradually acquired over an extended period of exposure to radiological images. This implicit (subconscious) knowledge is difficult to pass along explicitly (i.e. verbally) to less experienced radiologists. Multimedia technology has the potential to facilitate perceptual learning in new radiologists. However, it is important to have an objective and quantitative method for evaluating the progress of trainees using this approach. This paper proposes an eye-tracker-based metric for determining the level of expertise of a radiologist in training, based on where he/she lies along a scale based on the visual scanning behavior of radiologists, ranging from novice to expert.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2009 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems, CBMS 2009
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Event2009 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems, CBMS 2009 - Albuquerque, NM, United States
Duration: Aug 2 2009Aug 5 2009

Other

Other2009 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems, CBMS 2009
CountryUnited States
CityAlbuquerque, NM
Period8/2/098/5/09

Fingerprint

Scanning
Learning
Multimedia
Unconscious (Psychology)
Radiologists
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Alzubaidi, M., Black, J. A., Patel, A., & Panchanathan, S. (2009). Conscious vs. subconscious perception, as a function of radiological expertise. In 2009 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems, CBMS 2009 [5255353] https://doi.org/10.1109/CBMS.2009.5255353

Conscious vs. subconscious perception, as a function of radiological expertise. / Alzubaidi, Mohammad; Black, John A.; Patel, Ameet; Panchanathan, Sethuraman.

2009 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems, CBMS 2009. 2009. 5255353.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Alzubaidi, M, Black, JA, Patel, A & Panchanathan, S 2009, Conscious vs. subconscious perception, as a function of radiological expertise. in 2009 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems, CBMS 2009., 5255353, 2009 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems, CBMS 2009, Albuquerque, NM, United States, 8/2/09. https://doi.org/10.1109/CBMS.2009.5255353
Alzubaidi M, Black JA, Patel A, Panchanathan S. Conscious vs. subconscious perception, as a function of radiological expertise. In 2009 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems, CBMS 2009. 2009. 5255353 https://doi.org/10.1109/CBMS.2009.5255353
Alzubaidi, Mohammad ; Black, John A. ; Patel, Ameet ; Panchanathan, Sethuraman. / Conscious vs. subconscious perception, as a function of radiological expertise. 2009 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems, CBMS 2009. 2009.
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