Computers and commitment to a public management decision: An experiment

Barry Bozeman, R. F. Shangraw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Based on results of an experiment, hypotheses are tested concerning the effects of computer use on decision commitment. The experiment required subjects to make an adoption decision regarding a hypothetical government agency's innovation. Subjects could choose from a variety of information sets, some computer based, some not, before making the decision. After their decision the subjects were given "new evidence" that contradicted their initial position. Two experimental treatments included more difficult access to the computer-based information and higher cost for the computer-based information. Results indicate that access difficulty diminishes confidence in decisions and leads to lesser commitment. However, the cost of the computer information seems to have little bearing on decision commitment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-56
Number of pages15
JournalKnowledge in Society
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

public management
management decision
commitment
experiment
costs
government agency
Experiment
confidence
innovation
evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History and Philosophy of Science
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Computers and commitment to a public management decision : An experiment. / Bozeman, Barry; Shangraw, R. F.

In: Knowledge in Society, Vol. 2, No. 3, 05.1989, p. 42-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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