Computer-Mediated Instruction for Increasing Regular Education Students' Acceptance of Students with Mental Retardation

Deborah G. Hammond, Stanley Zucker, Karen Sullivan Burstein, Samuel DiGangi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The impact of computer-mediated technology on student preparation for inclusion was explored. Regular education students (36 males, 36 females) were assigned to one of three conditions: control, teacher instruction, and computer instruction. Following the respective treatments, two instruments, the Knowledge scale and the Social Distance Scale (Hazzard, Brightman, Baker, & Ambrose, 1981), were administered to assess any differences on knowledge of, and attitude towards children with mental retardation. Results indicated a significant interaction between condition and gender. Males in the computer instruction group out-performed males in the control and teacher instruction groups with respect to basic knowledge about children with special needs. There were no such differences for female students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-320
Number of pages8
JournalEducation and Training in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities
Volume32
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

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