Compression ignition engine modifications for straight plant oil fueling in remote contexts: Modification design and short-run testing

M. Basinger, T. Reding, C. Williams, Klaus Lackner, V. Modi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Though many plant oils have a similar energy density to fossil diesel fuel, several properties of plant oils are considerably different from those of diesel. Engine modifications can overcome some of these differences. An engine modification kit has been designed and tested for a slow speed, stationary, indirect-injection diesel engine - the Lister-type CS 6/1, common throughout the developing world. The kit allows waste vegetable oil fueling with similar performance to that of diesel fueling. The kit's simple yet robust design is targeted for use as a development mechanism, allowing remote farmers to use locally grown plant oils as a diesel substitute. The modification kit includes a preheating system and the tuning of the injector pressure and timing to better atomize given the unique properties of straight plant oils. The design methodology for the modifications is detailed and a suite of performance test results are described including fuel consumption, efficiency, pre-combustion chamber pressure, and various emissions. The results of the study show how a combination of preheating the high pressure fuel line, advancing the injector timing and increasing the injector valve opening pressure allows this engine to efficiently utilize plant oils as a diesel fuel substitute, potentially aiding remote rural farmers with a lower cost, sustainable fuel source - enabling important agro-processing mechanization in parts of the world that needs it most.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2925-2938
Number of pages14
JournalFuel
Volume89
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fueling
Plant Oils
Ignition
Compaction
Engines
Testing
Preheating
Diesel fuels
Mechanization
Vegetable oils
Combustion chambers
Fossil fuels
Fuel consumption
Diesel engines
Tuning
Oils
Processing
Costs

Keywords

  • CI engine
  • Diesel engine
  • Emissions
  • Plant oils
  • Straight vegetable oil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Fuel Technology
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

Compression ignition engine modifications for straight plant oil fueling in remote contexts : Modification design and short-run testing. / Basinger, M.; Reding, T.; Williams, C.; Lackner, Klaus; Modi, V.

In: Fuel, Vol. 89, No. 10, 2010, p. 2925-2938.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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