Components Analysis of Cognitive Strategy Instruction

Effects on Learning Disabled Students' Compositions and Self-Efficacy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

219 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The viability of self-instructional strategy training among learning disabled (LD) students exhibiting composition deficiencies was investigated. Furthermore, the theoretically proposed incremental effects of explicit self-regulation procedures were examined in terms of writing performance measures at posttest, maintenance, and generalization, and in terms of Ss self-efficacy. Ss were 22 LD and 11 normally achieving students in the 5th and 6th grades. Results indicated that self-instructional strategy training produced meaningful and lasting effects on Ss' composition skills and a significantly heightened sense of self-efficacy. Explicit self-regulation procedures did not significantly augment strategyinstruction effects for either writing performance or self-efficacy. Composition performance after instruction among LD Ss did not differ significantly in terms of story grammar elements from that of a contrast group of normally achieving, competent writers. However, normally achieving students' compositions were longer and received significantly higher quality ratings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-361
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume81
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
Learning
Students
instruction
self-regulation
learning
performance
student
grammar
school grade
rating
writer
Maintenance
Group
Self-Control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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abstract = "The viability of self-instructional strategy training among learning disabled (LD) students exhibiting composition deficiencies was investigated. Furthermore, the theoretically proposed incremental effects of explicit self-regulation procedures were examined in terms of writing performance measures at posttest, maintenance, and generalization, and in terms of Ss self-efficacy. Ss were 22 LD and 11 normally achieving students in the 5th and 6th grades. Results indicated that self-instructional strategy training produced meaningful and lasting effects on Ss' composition skills and a significantly heightened sense of self-efficacy. Explicit self-regulation procedures did not significantly augment strategyinstruction effects for either writing performance or self-efficacy. Composition performance after instruction among LD Ss did not differ significantly in terms of story grammar elements from that of a contrast group of normally achieving, competent writers. However, normally achieving students' compositions were longer and received significantly higher quality ratings.",
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