Complex effects of temperature on mosquito immune function

C. C. Murdock, Krijn Paaijmans, Andrew S. Bells, Jonas G. King, Julián F. Hillyer, Andrew F. Read, Matthew B. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the last 20 years, ecological immunology has provided much insight into how environmental factors shape host immunity and host-parasite interactions. Currently, the application of this thinking to the study of mosquito immunology has been limited. Mechanistic investigations are nearly always conducted under one set of conditions, yet vectors and parasites associate in a variable world. We highlight how environmental temperature shapes cellular and humoral immune responses (melanization, phagocytosis and transcription of immune genes) in the malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi. Nitric oxide synthase expression peaked at 308C, cecropin expression showed nomain effect of temperature and humoralmelanization, and phagocytosis and defensin expression peaked around 188C. Further, immune responses did not simply scale with temperature, but showed complex interactions between temperature, time and nature of immune challenge. Thus, immune patterns observed under one set of conditions provide little basis for predicting patterns under evenmarginally different conditions. These quantitative and qualitative effects of temperature have largely been overlooked in vector biology but have significant implications for extrapolating natural/transgenic resistance mechanisms from laboratory to field and for the efficacy of various vector control tools.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3357-3366
Number of pages10
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume279
Issue number1741
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Culicidae
mosquito
Temperature
Immunology
phagocytosis
immunology
temperature
Allergy and Immunology
immune response
Phagocytosis
Anopheles stephensi
melanization
Cecropins
vector control
host-parasite relationships
Defensins
host-parasite interaction
Host-Parasite Interactions
nitric oxide synthase
resistance mechanisms

Keywords

  • Innate immunity
  • Mosquito
  • Parasite
  • Temperature
  • Vector

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Murdock, C. C., Paaijmans, K., Bells, A. S., King, J. G., Hillyer, J. F., Read, A. F., & Thomas, M. B. (2012). Complex effects of temperature on mosquito immune function. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 279(1741), 3357-3366. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2012.0638

Complex effects of temperature on mosquito immune function. / Murdock, C. C.; Paaijmans, Krijn; Bells, Andrew S.; King, Jonas G.; Hillyer, Julián F.; Read, Andrew F.; Thomas, Matthew B.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 279, No. 1741, 01.01.2012, p. 3357-3366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murdock, CC, Paaijmans, K, Bells, AS, King, JG, Hillyer, JF, Read, AF & Thomas, MB 2012, 'Complex effects of temperature on mosquito immune function', Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 279, no. 1741, pp. 3357-3366. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2012.0638
Murdock, C. C. ; Paaijmans, Krijn ; Bells, Andrew S. ; King, Jonas G. ; Hillyer, Julián F. ; Read, Andrew F. ; Thomas, Matthew B. / Complex effects of temperature on mosquito immune function. In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2012 ; Vol. 279, No. 1741. pp. 3357-3366.
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