Abstract

It is common that phenol and quinoline co-exist in the same industrial wastewater, such as coking wastewater. For both biodegradations, the initial steps are mono-oxygenation reactions, which require two co-substrates: molecular oxygen (O2) and an intercellular electron donor (2H). Competition for O2 and 2H was investigated using a vertical baffled bioreactor (VBBR) with a biofilm acclimated to phenol and quinoline biodegradation. Batch experiments documented mutual inhibition between phenol and quinoline, which competed for O2, 2H, or both during simultaneous biodegradation. Low DO was a limiting factor for phenol and quinoline biodegradations, as both rates slowed significantly for DO ≤ 3 mg/L, compared to DO ≥ 5 mg/L. A DO concentration of 0.5 mg/L led to 89% and 65% slower removal kinetics for phenol and quinoline, respectively. Although adding succinate as an exogenous electron donor was able to alleviate competition when the DO was 4 ∼ 5 mg/L, it had no benefit for a DO ≤ 3 mg/L. Thus, significant DO limitation could not be overcome by addition of more donor. The results imply that a strategy that involves adding or creating an exogenous electron donor may be effective only when DO is not significantly rate limiting for the initial oxygenation reactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalProcess Biochemistry
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Molecular oxygen
Phenol
Biodegradation
Phenols
Electrons
Oxygen
Oxygenation
Waste Water
Wastewater
Coking
Biofilms
Succinic Acid
Bioreactors
quinoline
Kinetics
Substrates
Experiments

Keywords

  • Biodegradation
  • Intracellular electron donors
  • Molecular oxygen
  • Phenol
  • Quinoline

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Biochemistry
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

Competition for molecular oxygen and electron donor between phenol and quinoline during their simultaneous biodegradation. / Zou, Shasha; Zhang, Bingbing; Yan, Ning; Zhang, Chenyuan; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Yongming; Rittmann, Bruce.

In: Process Biochemistry, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "It is common that phenol and quinoline co-exist in the same industrial wastewater, such as coking wastewater. For both biodegradations, the initial steps are mono-oxygenation reactions, which require two co-substrates: molecular oxygen (O2) and an intercellular electron donor (2H). Competition for O2 and 2H was investigated using a vertical baffled bioreactor (VBBR) with a biofilm acclimated to phenol and quinoline biodegradation. Batch experiments documented mutual inhibition between phenol and quinoline, which competed for O2, 2H, or both during simultaneous biodegradation. Low DO was a limiting factor for phenol and quinoline biodegradations, as both rates slowed significantly for DO ≤ 3 mg/L, compared to DO ≥ 5 mg/L. A DO concentration of 0.5 mg/L led to 89{\%} and 65{\%} slower removal kinetics for phenol and quinoline, respectively. Although adding succinate as an exogenous electron donor was able to alleviate competition when the DO was 4 ∼ 5 mg/L, it had no benefit for a DO ≤ 3 mg/L. Thus, significant DO limitation could not be overcome by addition of more donor. The results imply that a strategy that involves adding or creating an exogenous electron donor may be effective only when DO is not significantly rate limiting for the initial oxygenation reactions.",
keywords = "Biodegradation, Intracellular electron donors, Molecular oxygen, Phenol, Quinoline",
author = "Shasha Zou and Bingbing Zhang and Ning Yan and Chenyuan Zhang and Hua Xu and Yongming Zhang and Bruce Rittmann",
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T1 - Competition for molecular oxygen and electron donor between phenol and quinoline during their simultaneous biodegradation

AU - Zou, Shasha

AU - Zhang, Bingbing

AU - Yan, Ning

AU - Zhang, Chenyuan

AU - Xu, Hua

AU - Zhang, Yongming

AU - Rittmann, Bruce

PY - 2018/1/1

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N2 - It is common that phenol and quinoline co-exist in the same industrial wastewater, such as coking wastewater. For both biodegradations, the initial steps are mono-oxygenation reactions, which require two co-substrates: molecular oxygen (O2) and an intercellular electron donor (2H). Competition for O2 and 2H was investigated using a vertical baffled bioreactor (VBBR) with a biofilm acclimated to phenol and quinoline biodegradation. Batch experiments documented mutual inhibition between phenol and quinoline, which competed for O2, 2H, or both during simultaneous biodegradation. Low DO was a limiting factor for phenol and quinoline biodegradations, as both rates slowed significantly for DO ≤ 3 mg/L, compared to DO ≥ 5 mg/L. A DO concentration of 0.5 mg/L led to 89% and 65% slower removal kinetics for phenol and quinoline, respectively. Although adding succinate as an exogenous electron donor was able to alleviate competition when the DO was 4 ∼ 5 mg/L, it had no benefit for a DO ≤ 3 mg/L. Thus, significant DO limitation could not be overcome by addition of more donor. The results imply that a strategy that involves adding or creating an exogenous electron donor may be effective only when DO is not significantly rate limiting for the initial oxygenation reactions.

AB - It is common that phenol and quinoline co-exist in the same industrial wastewater, such as coking wastewater. For both biodegradations, the initial steps are mono-oxygenation reactions, which require two co-substrates: molecular oxygen (O2) and an intercellular electron donor (2H). Competition for O2 and 2H was investigated using a vertical baffled bioreactor (VBBR) with a biofilm acclimated to phenol and quinoline biodegradation. Batch experiments documented mutual inhibition between phenol and quinoline, which competed for O2, 2H, or both during simultaneous biodegradation. Low DO was a limiting factor for phenol and quinoline biodegradations, as both rates slowed significantly for DO ≤ 3 mg/L, compared to DO ≥ 5 mg/L. A DO concentration of 0.5 mg/L led to 89% and 65% slower removal kinetics for phenol and quinoline, respectively. Although adding succinate as an exogenous electron donor was able to alleviate competition when the DO was 4 ∼ 5 mg/L, it had no benefit for a DO ≤ 3 mg/L. Thus, significant DO limitation could not be overcome by addition of more donor. The results imply that a strategy that involves adding or creating an exogenous electron donor may be effective only when DO is not significantly rate limiting for the initial oxygenation reactions.

KW - Biodegradation

KW - Intracellular electron donors

KW - Molecular oxygen

KW - Phenol

KW - Quinoline

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