Comparison of traffic accident and chronic disease risk perceptions

Deborah C. Glik, Jennie Jacobs Kronenfeld, Kirby Jackson, Weiyang Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess whether having a commonly identified risk factor for certain chronic diseases or accidents predicted higher perceptions of risk for those health problems. Methods: Survey data from 618 adults in a southeastern metropolitan area were used. Health status and socio-demographic measures were identified as risk factors and examined as predictors of risk perceptions. Results: Older, less healthy adults saw themselves at greater risk for cancer and heart disease. Younger men did not see themselves at greater risk for traffic accidents. Selected risk factors for heart disease and cancer were more important in predicting risk perceptions for those diseases than selected risk factors for traffic-related injury. Conclusions: Individuals are less aware of their traffic-accident risk factors and more aware of their chronic-disease risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)198-208
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume23
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 1999

Fingerprint

Traffic Accidents
traffic accident
Chronic Disease
Disease
Heart Diseases
heart disease
Heart Neoplasms
cancer
Health Status
Accidents
accident risk
Demography
Health
Wounds and Injuries
health status
agglomeration area
accident
traffic
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Leadership and Management

Cite this

Glik, D. C., Kronenfeld, J. J., Jackson, K., & Zhang, W. (1999). Comparison of traffic accident and chronic disease risk perceptions. American Journal of Health Behavior, 23(3), 198-208.

Comparison of traffic accident and chronic disease risk perceptions. / Glik, Deborah C.; Kronenfeld, Jennie Jacobs; Jackson, Kirby; Zhang, Weiyang.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 23, No. 3, 05.1999, p. 198-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Glik, DC, Kronenfeld, JJ, Jackson, K & Zhang, W 1999, 'Comparison of traffic accident and chronic disease risk perceptions', American Journal of Health Behavior, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 198-208.
Glik DC, Kronenfeld JJ, Jackson K, Zhang W. Comparison of traffic accident and chronic disease risk perceptions. American Journal of Health Behavior. 1999 May;23(3):198-208.
Glik, Deborah C. ; Kronenfeld, Jennie Jacobs ; Jackson, Kirby ; Zhang, Weiyang. / Comparison of traffic accident and chronic disease risk perceptions. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 1999 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 198-208.
@article{444ddfb86ce9438e9df010c106e75965,
title = "Comparison of traffic accident and chronic disease risk perceptions",
abstract = "Objective: To assess whether having a commonly identified risk factor for certain chronic diseases or accidents predicted higher perceptions of risk for those health problems. Methods: Survey data from 618 adults in a southeastern metropolitan area were used. Health status and socio-demographic measures were identified as risk factors and examined as predictors of risk perceptions. Results: Older, less healthy adults saw themselves at greater risk for cancer and heart disease. Younger men did not see themselves at greater risk for traffic accidents. Selected risk factors for heart disease and cancer were more important in predicting risk perceptions for those diseases than selected risk factors for traffic-related injury. Conclusions: Individuals are less aware of their traffic-accident risk factors and more aware of their chronic-disease risk factors.",
author = "Glik, {Deborah C.} and Kronenfeld, {Jennie Jacobs} and Kirby Jackson and Weiyang Zhang",
year = "1999",
month = "5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "198--208",
journal = "American Journal of Health Behavior",
issn = "1087-3244",
publisher = "PNG Publications",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of traffic accident and chronic disease risk perceptions

AU - Glik, Deborah C.

AU - Kronenfeld, Jennie Jacobs

AU - Jackson, Kirby

AU - Zhang, Weiyang

PY - 1999/5

Y1 - 1999/5

N2 - Objective: To assess whether having a commonly identified risk factor for certain chronic diseases or accidents predicted higher perceptions of risk for those health problems. Methods: Survey data from 618 adults in a southeastern metropolitan area were used. Health status and socio-demographic measures were identified as risk factors and examined as predictors of risk perceptions. Results: Older, less healthy adults saw themselves at greater risk for cancer and heart disease. Younger men did not see themselves at greater risk for traffic accidents. Selected risk factors for heart disease and cancer were more important in predicting risk perceptions for those diseases than selected risk factors for traffic-related injury. Conclusions: Individuals are less aware of their traffic-accident risk factors and more aware of their chronic-disease risk factors.

AB - Objective: To assess whether having a commonly identified risk factor for certain chronic diseases or accidents predicted higher perceptions of risk for those health problems. Methods: Survey data from 618 adults in a southeastern metropolitan area were used. Health status and socio-demographic measures were identified as risk factors and examined as predictors of risk perceptions. Results: Older, less healthy adults saw themselves at greater risk for cancer and heart disease. Younger men did not see themselves at greater risk for traffic accidents. Selected risk factors for heart disease and cancer were more important in predicting risk perceptions for those diseases than selected risk factors for traffic-related injury. Conclusions: Individuals are less aware of their traffic-accident risk factors and more aware of their chronic-disease risk factors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033426540&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033426540&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0033426540

VL - 23

SP - 198

EP - 208

JO - American Journal of Health Behavior

JF - American Journal of Health Behavior

SN - 1087-3244

IS - 3

ER -