Comparing the Ethnic Identity and Well-Being of Adopted Korean Americans With Immigrant/U.S.-Born Korean Americans and Korean International Students

Richard M. Lee, Andrea Bora Yun, Hyung Yoo, Kim Park Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study compared the ethnic identity and well-being of Korean Americans who were adopted internationally with immigrant/U.S.-born Korean Americans and Korean international students, as well as the relationship between ethnic identity and well-being for each group. One-hundred seven college students completed measures of ethnic identity and subjective well-being. Immigrant/U.S.-born Korean Americans had higher ethnic identity scores than the other two groups. Immigrant/U.S.-born Korean Americans also had higher positive affect scores than international students. Ethnic identity was positively correlated with positive affect for all three groups (r = .27 to .34) but was negatively correlated with negative affect for international students (r = -.44). Overall, the results suggest that ethnic identity, although slightly lower than in non-adopted peers, is relevant to the well-being of adopted Korean American college students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2-17
Number of pages16
JournalAdoption Quarterly
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

Keywords

  • Ethic identity
  • International adoption
  • Korea
  • Well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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