Comparing strategies for presenting concepts in introductory undergraduate geography: Physical models vs. computer visualization

Robert Edsall, Elizabeth Wentz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two experiments investigating the benefit of computer-based applications in geography education are presented. The computer-based methods employ concepts of visualization, including animation and interactivity, to facilitate active learning. These computer-based methods are compared with physical (i.e. tangible) models, which themselves can be considered active learning tools. Thus, this report compares a pair of learning strategies using interactive external cognitive tools (one computer-based and one physical), rather than more typical studies which compare an approach using such interactive tools with an approach using more traditional lecture-based presentations. Results confirm existing findings that computer-based approaches are appealing to students but are not, by themselves, significantly beneficial in enabling understanding of complex concepts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-444
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Geography in Higher Education
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

Keywords

  • Animation
  • GIS
  • Geomorphology
  • Lectureware
  • Map projections
  • Visualization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Education

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