Comparing male and female juveniles charged with homicide

Child maltreatment, substance abuse, and crime details

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines a sample of 136 male and female juveniles charged with attempted homicide or homicide. The purpose of this study is to explore the differences between nondirect file male and female juvenile homicide offenders regarding individual, family, and crime circumstances. Findings suggest that compared to male juvenile offenders, female juvenile homicide offenders have higher rates of reported childhood abuse, more serious substance abuse, and mental health problems including suicidal ideations, depression, anxiety, anger, and irritability. Male juvenile homicide offenders reported higher rates of substance use than their female counterparts but the females had more serious substance abuse problems. Female juveniles were found to more often kill a person known to them and male homicide offenders were found to more often kill a stranger. These findings suggest strongly that male and female juvenile homicide offenders are dissimilar and require unique assessment and treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)601-617
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

Fingerprint

Homicide
Child Abuse
Crime
Substance-Related Disorders
Suicidal Ideation
Anger
Mental Health
Anxiety
Depression

Keywords

  • Delinquency
  • Female juvenile offenders
  • Homicide
  • Juveniles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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abstract = "This study examines a sample of 136 male and female juveniles charged with attempted homicide or homicide. The purpose of this study is to explore the differences between nondirect file male and female juvenile homicide offenders regarding individual, family, and crime circumstances. Findings suggest that compared to male juvenile offenders, female juvenile homicide offenders have higher rates of reported childhood abuse, more serious substance abuse, and mental health problems including suicidal ideations, depression, anxiety, anger, and irritability. Male juvenile homicide offenders reported higher rates of substance use than their female counterparts but the females had more serious substance abuse problems. Female juveniles were found to more often kill a person known to them and male homicide offenders were found to more often kill a stranger. These findings suggest strongly that male and female juvenile homicide offenders are dissimilar and require unique assessment and treatment.",
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