Comparing Aurora A and Aurora B as molecular targets for growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer cells

Steven L. Warner, Ruben M. Munoz, Phillip Stafford, Erich Koller, Laurence H. Hurley, Daniel D. Von Hoff, Haiyong Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To address the increased need to understand the similarities and differences in targeting Aurora A or Aurora B for the treatment of cancer, we systematically evaluated the relative importance of Aurora A and/or Aurora B as molecular targets using antisense oligonucleotides. It was found that perturbations in Aurora A and Aurora B signaling result in growth arrest and a apoptosis preferentially in cancer cells. The biological fingerprints of Aurora A and Aurora B inhibition were compared and contrasted in efforts to identify the superior therapeutic target. Due to the different biological responses, we conclude that each Aurora kinase should be treated as autonomous drug targets, which can be targeted independently or in combination. We observed no advantages to targeting both kinases simultaneously and feel that an Aurora A-targeted therapy may have some beneficial consequences over an Aurora B -targeted therapy, such as mitotic arrest and the rapid induction of apoptosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2450-2458
Number of pages9
JournalMolecular Cancer Therapeutics
Volume5
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

Fingerprint

Pancreatic Neoplasms
Growth
Aurora Kinases
Apoptosis
Antisense Oligonucleotides
Dermatoglyphics
Neoplasms
Phosphotransferases
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Drug Discovery
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Warner, S. L., Munoz, R. M., Stafford, P., Koller, E., Hurley, L. H., Von Hoff, D. D., & Han, H. (2006). Comparing Aurora A and Aurora B as molecular targets for growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer cells. Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, 5(10), 2450-2458. https://doi.org/10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-06-0202

Comparing Aurora A and Aurora B as molecular targets for growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer cells. / Warner, Steven L.; Munoz, Ruben M.; Stafford, Phillip; Koller, Erich; Hurley, Laurence H.; Von Hoff, Daniel D.; Han, Haiyong.

In: Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, Vol. 5, No. 10, 10.2006, p. 2450-2458.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Warner, SL, Munoz, RM, Stafford, P, Koller, E, Hurley, LH, Von Hoff, DD & Han, H 2006, 'Comparing Aurora A and Aurora B as molecular targets for growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer cells', Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, vol. 5, no. 10, pp. 2450-2458. https://doi.org/10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-06-0202
Warner, Steven L. ; Munoz, Ruben M. ; Stafford, Phillip ; Koller, Erich ; Hurley, Laurence H. ; Von Hoff, Daniel D. ; Han, Haiyong. / Comparing Aurora A and Aurora B as molecular targets for growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer cells. In: Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. 2006 ; Vol. 5, No. 10. pp. 2450-2458.
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