Commercial Vinegar Tablets Do Not Display the Same Physiological Benefits for Managing Postprandial Glucose Concentrations as Liquid Vinegar

Natasha K. Feise, Carol S. Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective. Research evidence suggests that vinegar may effectively reduce postprandial glucose in both healthy adults and those with type 2 diabetes. There is heightened consumer interest in commercially available vinegar tablets; however, it is not known whether these products lower postprandial glycemia to the same extent as liquid vinegar. This crossover trial examined the impact of liquid vinegar versus commercial vinegar tablet ingestion at the start of a meal on the 60-minute glucose excursion postmeal in healthy adults. Methods. Twelve young men and women (22.6 ± 0.6 y; 21.2 ± 1.2 kg/m2) completed this 4-arm Latin square crossover trial. Testing was separated by one week and consisted of a test meal (64 g carbohydrate) consumed immediately following one of the four oral treatments: CON, 60 g water (control treatment); VIN, 25 g liquid vinegar (5% acidity; 1.25 g acetic acid) diluted with 35 g water; PILL, four vinegar tablets (1.50 g acetic acid) swallowed whole with 60 g water; and PILL-c, four crushed vinegar tablets dissolved in 60 g water. Capillary blood glucose was tested in the fasted state and at 30 and 60 minutes postmeal. Results. The 60-minute glucose excursion varied significantly by treatment (iAUC: 4.9 ± 0.6, 3.4 ± 0.4, 4.9 ± 0.6, and 4.1 ± 0.5 mmolh/l for CON, VIN, PILL, and PILL-c, respectively; F (3, 33) = 3.037, p = 0.043; repeated measures ANOVA). Post hoc analysis revealed a 31% reduction in the glucose postmeal excursion for VIN in comparison to CON and PILL (p = 0.040 and p = 0.049, respectively). Conclusions. These data suggest that commercial vinegar tablets taken whole at mealtime are not as effective as liquid vinegar for reducing the postmeal glucose excursion in young, healthy adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9098739
JournalJournal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume2020
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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