Colon Neoplasms Develop Early in the Course of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

Erin W. Thackeray, Phunchai Charatcharoenwitthaya, Diaa Elfaki, Emmanouil Sinakos, Keith D. Lindor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background & Aims: Colon cancer surveillance guidelines for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) suggest annual colonoscopy once the diagnosis of concomitant disease is made, but there is little evidence to support this recommendation. We conducted a retrospective review of patients with colonic neoplasms (colon cancer or dysplasia) to test this guideline's validity and determined when colonic neoplasms occurred in the population. Methods: Records were retrospectively reviewed from 54 patients with IBD, PSC, and colonic neoplasia for dates of diagnosis of IBD, PSC, and colon neoplasia and descriptive information about the colon neoplasms that developed. Results: The occurrence of colon neoplasms within 2 years of diagnosis of IBD and PSC (21.5 per 100 patient years of follow-up) was similar to the occurrence within 8 to 10 years from diagnosis of IBD and PSC (20.4 per 100 patient years of follow-up). The colonic neoplasms that developed in this population were spread throughout the colon. Conclusions: Patients with IBD and PSC have a risk of developing colonic neoplasms soon after the coexistence of the 2 diseases is discovered. This finding supports the current colon cancer surveillance guideline recommendations of yearly colonoscopies for this patient population, beginning at the time of diagnosis of PSC in patients with IBD or with the diagnosis of IBD in patients with PSC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)52-56
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Colon Cancer
  • Crohn's Disease
  • Dysplasia
  • Ulcerative Colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

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