College student alcohol use and confidence to intervene in interpersonal violence: Differences by gender and sexual orientation

Ruschelle M. Leone, Daniel Oesterle, Harshita Yepuri, Debra L. Kaysen, Lindsay Orchowski, Kelly Cue Davis, Amanda K. Gilmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: The current study examined the association between alcohol use frequency (ie, days a week one consumes alcohol), sexual and gender identity, and bystander confidence to intervene in interpersonal violence (ie, bystander self-efficacy). Participants: Participants were 750 undergraduate students aged 18–25 (260 heterosexual men, 260 heterosexual women, 59 SM men [54 cisgender, 5 transgender men], and 171 SM women [169 cisgender, 2 transgender women]). Methods: Participants completed an online survey about alcohol and sexual behaviors. Results: Results indicated that (1) alcohol use frequency was positively associated with greater bystander self-efficacy, (2) heterosexual men, compared to heterosexual women, reported lower bystander self-efficacy, and (3) the association between alcohol use frequency and bystander self-efficacy was significant and positive among heterosexual, but not SM, women. Conclusions: Prevention efforts may benefit from targeting individuals who drink more frequently and ensuring that they have the skills to effectively intervene.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of American College Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Alcohol use
  • bystander effect
  • college students
  • gender identity
  • sexual orientation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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