Collaborative medicine case studies

Evidence in practice

Rodger Kessler, Dale Stafford

Research output: Book/ReportBook

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Collaborative Medicine Case Studies Evidence in Practice Edited by Rodger Kessler and Dale Stafford, Berlin Family Health, Montpelier, Vermont and Department of Family Medicine University of Vermont College of Medicine Just as the mind and body collaborate in maintaining one's health, collaboration between primary and behavioral health care can bring patients more efficacious treatment and better long-term results, from better compliance with or less dependence on medication to more effective use of health care services. Collaborative Medicine Case Studies shows physicians and mental health practitioners working together across a variety of settings to assess and treat entrenched illnesses, combined physical and psychological conditions (back pain/panic attacks, diabetes/bipolar disorder), and cases that defy straightforward diagnosis. At the same time, the cases reflect the economic and financial realities of contemporary health care. The cases discussed generate creative solutions using different levels of collaboration depending on patient need and site variables, but all share important similarities: close communication, careful follow-up by physician and behavioral health collaborators, and patients who would not have been treated as effectively without collaborative care. Blending research evidence, clinical insight, welcome humor, and realistic optimism, these cases demonstrate impressive successes, instructive setbacks, and comparative viewpoints while shedding light on the logistical, financial, and training challenges of integrative practice. A sampling of the three dozen cases: The head and the brain: migraines, orofacial pain, tinnitus. Comorbid PTSD and persistent pain. Individuals and couples with complex medical/emotional problems. Chronic illnesses: obesity, spina bifida, cardiovascular disease. A Hmong woman's post-immigration depression. A physician with anorexia Burn patients who keep coming back without treatment success. Collaborative Medicine Case Studies is a blueprint for a vanguard in care, not only for physicians and psychologists but also for professionals and graduate students in health psychology and health care administration and finance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherSpringer New York
Number of pages440
ISBN (Print)9780387768939
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medicine
Physicians
Delivery of Health Care
Psychology
Behavioral Medicine
Facial Pain
Wit and Humor
Spinal Dysraphism
Tinnitus
Family Health
Panic Disorder
Emigration and Immigration
Health
Anorexia
Berlin
Back Pain
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Migraine Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Health Services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Collaborative medicine case studies : Evidence in practice. / Kessler, Rodger; Stafford, Dale.

Springer New York, 2008. 440 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Kessler, Rodger ; Stafford, Dale. / Collaborative medicine case studies : Evidence in practice. Springer New York, 2008. 440 p.
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