Colder environments did not select for a faster metabolism during experimental evolution of Drosophila melanogaster

Lesley A. Alton, Catriona Condon, Craig R. White, Michael Angilletta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of temperature on the evolution of metabolism has been the subject of debate for a century; however, no consistent patterns have emerged from comparisons of metabolic rate within and among species living at different temperatures. We used experimental evolution to determine how metabolism evolves in populations of Drosophila melanogaster exposed to one of three selective treatments: a constant 16°C, a constant 25°C, or temporal fluctuations between 16 and 25°C. We tested August Krogh's controversial hypothesis that colder environments select for a faster metabolism. Given that colder environments also experience greater seasonality, we also tested the hypothesis that temporal variation in temperature may be the factor that selects for a faster metabolism. We measured the metabolic rate of flies from each selective treatment at 16, 20.5, and 25°C. Although metabolism was faster at higher temperatures, flies from the selective treatments had similar metabolic rates at each measurement temperature. Based on variation among genotypes within populations, heritable variation in metabolism was likely sufficient for adaptation to occur. We conclude that colder or seasonal environments do not necessarily select for a faster metabolism. Rather, other factors besides temperature likely contribute to patterns of metabolic rate over thermal clines in nature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-152
Number of pages8
JournalEvolution
Volume71
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Drosophila melanogaster
metabolism
Temperature
temperature
Diptera
cline
cold
Population
seasonality
temporal variation
genotype
Hot Temperature
Genotype
heat
rate

Keywords

  • Drosophila
  • experimental evolution
  • Krogh's rule
  • metabolic cold adaptation
  • metabolic rate
  • temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Colder environments did not select for a faster metabolism during experimental evolution of Drosophila melanogaster. / Alton, Lesley A.; Condon, Catriona; White, Craig R.; Angilletta, Michael.

In: Evolution, Vol. 71, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 145-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alton, Lesley A. ; Condon, Catriona ; White, Craig R. ; Angilletta, Michael. / Colder environments did not select for a faster metabolism during experimental evolution of Drosophila melanogaster. In: Evolution. 2017 ; Vol. 71, No. 1. pp. 145-152.
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