Cognitive analysis of decision support for antibiotic prescribing at the point of ordering in a neonatal intensive care unit.

Barbara Sheehan, David Kaufman, Peter Stetson, Leanne M. Currie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Computerized decision support systems have been used to help ensure safe medication prescribing. However, the acceptance of these types of decision support has been reported to be low. It has been suggested that decreased acceptance may be due to lack of clinical relevance. Additionally, cognitive fit between the user interface and clinical task may impact the response of clinicians as they interact with the system. In order to better understand clinician responses to such decision support, we used cognitive task analysis methods to evaluate clinical alerts for antibiotic prescribing in a neonatal intensive care unit. Two methods were used: 1) a cognitive walkthrough; and 2) usability testing with a 'think-aloud' protocol. Data were analyzed for impact on cognitive effort according to categories of cognitive distance. We found that responses to alerts may be context specific and that lack of screen cues often increases cognitive effort required to use a system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)584-588
Number of pages5
JournalAMIA ... Annual Symposium proceedings / AMIA Symposium. AMIA Symposium
Volume2009
StatePublished - 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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