Cognitions of test-anxious children

Sheri Zatz, Laurie Chassin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Compared the cognitions of 294 low, moderate, and high test-anxious (the Test Anxiety Scale for Children) 5th and 6th graders in an analog test situation. High test-anxious Ss reported significantly more task-debilitating cognitions than either moderate- or low-anxious Ss, including negative evaluations and off-task thoughts. High test-anxious Ss also reported fewer positive evaluations than low test-anxious Ss, whereas moderately anxious Ss did not differ significantly from either extreme group. It was unexpected that the moderate- and high-anxious groups reported significantly more on-task thoughts than the low-anxious group and did not significantly differ from each other. Both test anxiety and cognitions showed significant although modest relations with actual task performance after the effects of ability were partialled out. (20 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)526-534
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Cognition
Test Anxiety Scale
Aptitude
Task Performance and Analysis
Anxiety

Keywords

  • task performance, 5th-6th graders
  • test anxiety level, task-facilitating vs task-debilitating cognitions &

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Cognitions of test-anxious children. / Zatz, Sheri; Chassin, Laurie.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 51, No. 4, 08.1983, p. 526-534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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