Co-occurring marijuana use is associated with medication nonadherence and nonplanning impulsivity in young adult heavy drinkers

Erica N. Peters, Robert F. Leeman, Lisa M. Fucito, Benjamin A. Toll, William Corbin, Stephanie S. O'Malley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Few studies have examined the co-occurrence of alcohol and marijuana use in clinical samples of young adults. The present study investigated whether co-occurring marijuana use is associated with characteristics indicative of a high level of risk in young adult heavy drinkers. Individuals between the ages of 18 and 25. years (N= 122) participated in an ongoing 8-week randomized clinical trial that tested the efficacy of placebo-controlled naltrexone plus brief individual counseling to reduce heavy drinking. At intake participants completed self-report assessments on alcohol consumption, alcohol-related negative consequences, motivation to reduce drinking, trait impulsivity, expectancies for alcohol-induced disinhibition, use of cigarettes, and history of medication nonadherence. In univariate tests heavy drinkers with and without co-occurring marijuana use did not differ on alcohol consumption, most alcohol-related negative consequences, and motivation to reduce drinking. In multivariate tests controlling for demographic characteristics, co-occurring heavy alcohol and marijuana use was significantly associated with nonplanning impulsivity (β = 2.95) and a history of both unintentional (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.30) and purposeful (aOR = 3.98) nonadherence to medication. Findings suggest that young adult heavy drinkers with co-occurring marijuana use exhibit a high-risk clinical profile and may benefit from interventions that increase adherence to medications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)420-426
Number of pages7
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Co-occurring
  • College drinking
  • Impulsivity
  • Marijuana
  • Medication adherence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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