Closing the performance feedback gap with expert systems

David Van Fleet, Tim O. Peterson, Ella W. Van Fleet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dictums of "don't be judgmental" and "don't say anything at all if you can't say something nice" seem to be sufficiently ingrained to make many managers reluctant to provide performance feedback. The barriers to providing feedback, especially negative feedback, range from managers' fears of hurting employee feelings to potential workplace violence. They inhibit managers from providing performance feedback that can help employees grow and develop or enable the organization to eliminate poor performers. While a number of writers have offered strategies such as social learning, education, and training to overcome these barriers, the problem still exists. This paper suggests that Expert Systems (ESs), a relatively new type of tool, can improve the performance feedback skills of both experienced and inexperienced managers. ESs offer managers a means both to increase their knowledge of what makes for an effective appraisal feedback session and to improve their skills in performing this important task in a manner that best fits each employee in each unique situation. By providing managers this just-in-time knowledge, ESs can help managers become more consistent and more effective than ever before in providing performance feedback.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-53
Number of pages16
JournalAcademy of Management Executive
Volume19
Issue number3
StatePublished - Aug 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Performance feedback
Managers
Expert system
Employees
Social learning
Education
Negative feedback
Workplace violence
Just-in-time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing

Cite this

Van Fleet, D., Peterson, T. O., & Van Fleet, E. W. (2005). Closing the performance feedback gap with expert systems. Academy of Management Executive, 19(3), 38-53.

Closing the performance feedback gap with expert systems. / Van Fleet, David; Peterson, Tim O.; Van Fleet, Ella W.

In: Academy of Management Executive, Vol. 19, No. 3, 08.2005, p. 38-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Van Fleet, D, Peterson, TO & Van Fleet, EW 2005, 'Closing the performance feedback gap with expert systems', Academy of Management Executive, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 38-53.
Van Fleet D, Peterson TO, Van Fleet EW. Closing the performance feedback gap with expert systems. Academy of Management Executive. 2005 Aug;19(3):38-53.
Van Fleet, David ; Peterson, Tim O. ; Van Fleet, Ella W. / Closing the performance feedback gap with expert systems. In: Academy of Management Executive. 2005 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 38-53.
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