Clinical decision support systems for the practice of evidence-based medicine

I. Sim, P. Gorman, Robert Greenes, R. B. Haynes, B. Kaplan, H. Lehmann, P. C. Tang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

330 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The use of clinical decision support systems to facilitate the practice of evidence-based medicine promises to substantially improve health care quality. Objective: To describe, on the basis of the proceedings of the Evidence and Decision Support track at the 2000 AMIA Spring Symposium, the research and policy challenges for capturing research and practice-based evidence in machine-interpretable repositories, and to present recommendations for accelerating the development and adoption of clinical decision support systems for evidence-based medicine. Results: The recommendations fall into five broad areas-capture literature-based and practice-based evidence in machine-interpretable knowledge bases; develop maintainable technical and methodological foundations for computer-based decision support; evaluate the clinical effects and costs of clinical decision support systems and the ways clinical decision support systems affect and are affected by professional and organizational practices; identify and disseminate best practices for work flow-sensitive implementations of clinical decision support systems; and establish public policies that provide incentives for implementing clinical decision support systems to improve health care quality. Conclusions: Although the promise of clinical decision support system-facilitated evidence-based medicine is strong, substantial work remains to be done to realize the potential benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-534
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Medical Informatics Association
Volume8
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Clinical Decision Support Systems
Evidence-Based Medicine
Quality of Health Care
Evidence-Based Practice
Professional Practice
Knowledge Bases
Workflow
Public Policy
Practice Guidelines
Research
Motivation
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sim, I., Gorman, P., Greenes, R., Haynes, R. B., Kaplan, B., Lehmann, H., & Tang, P. C. (2001). Clinical decision support systems for the practice of evidence-based medicine. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 8(6), 527-534.

Clinical decision support systems for the practice of evidence-based medicine. / Sim, I.; Gorman, P.; Greenes, Robert; Haynes, R. B.; Kaplan, B.; Lehmann, H.; Tang, P. C.

In: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, Vol. 8, No. 6, 2001, p. 527-534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sim, I, Gorman, P, Greenes, R, Haynes, RB, Kaplan, B, Lehmann, H & Tang, PC 2001, 'Clinical decision support systems for the practice of evidence-based medicine', Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, vol. 8, no. 6, pp. 527-534.
Sim, I. ; Gorman, P. ; Greenes, Robert ; Haynes, R. B. ; Kaplan, B. ; Lehmann, H. ; Tang, P. C. / Clinical decision support systems for the practice of evidence-based medicine. In: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. 2001 ; Vol. 8, No. 6. pp. 527-534.
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