Climate change and tropical agriculture: Implications for social vulnerability and food security

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

A review of relevant data would lead one to be optimistic about the world’s future capacity to feed itself under projected scenarios of climate change. On the whole, food production has kept up with population growth, the prices of cereals have been gradually declining, and trade models suggest that markets can move food effectively between countries and continents to compensate for deficits (Food and Agriculture Organization [FAO], 2003). Assuming that farmers can and will make adjustments in crop varieties, planting dates, irrigation applications, and the area they plant, research has shown that anticipated negative impacts of climate change on yields can be partially or perhaps even largely mitigated at the global scale (Helms et al., 1996; Rosenzweig and Parry, 1993).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationClimate Change and Global Food Security
PublisherCRC Press
Pages293-320
Number of pages28
ISBN (Electronic)9781420028614
ISBN (Print)9780824725365
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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  • Cite this

    Eakin, H. (2005). Climate change and tropical agriculture: Implications for social vulnerability and food security. In Climate Change and Global Food Security (pp. 293-320). CRC Press.