Civil wars and contemporary state building: Rebellion, conflict duration, and lootable resources

David Sobek, Cameron Thies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Regardless of the outcome, civil wars are destructive events. They not only devastate the physical and human capital of a society, but also have a direct effect on state capacity. The capacity of the state is critical as it attempts to rebuild society and minimize the risk of a new civil conflict; yet, it is still not clear how civil war precisely affects state capacity. In general, we argue that incumbent victors are more likely to end with a stronger state when the conflict is short and the victory is decisive. In contrast, rebel victors require more time to build their internal capacity and thus have stronger states after a longer conflict, especially when they had access to lootable resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-69
Number of pages19
JournalCivil Wars
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Political Science and International Relations
  • History

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