Citizen perceptions of procedural fairness and the moderating roles of ‘belief in a just world’ and ‘public service motivation’ in public hiring

Mogens Jin Pedersen, Justin Stritch, Gabel Taggart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article expands our knowledge of how variation in public administrative processes affects citizen perceptions of procedural fairness (CPPF). Focusing on a specific administrative process—the selection and hiring process—we use a survey experimental design among 823 US citizens and examine the effect of a public hiring process involving the appearance of advocacy from an applicant's social contacts on CPPF. Moreover, we theoretically and empirically examine the moderating effects of two psychological constructs: ‘belief in a just world’ and ‘public service motivation’. We find that citizens rate the procedural fairness of a hiring situation much lower when the situation appears to be influenced by an applicant's social contacts. However, citizens who report stronger ‘belief in a just world’ have less concern with a hiring process marked by advocacy, whereas citizens with higher levels of ‘public service motivation’ have more concern.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)874-894
Number of pages21
JournalPublic Administration
Volume95
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration

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