Citizen contacting and bureaucratic treatment-response in urban government

Some further evidence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Citizen-bureaucratic relationships are particularly important in the urban government context. Drawing upon survey data from one city, this article examines whether certain individual-level characteristics, such as ethnic background and age, are related to citizen evaluations of bureaucratic treatment. Different individual-level characteristics are related to citizen evaluations of different types of bureaucratic contacts. The evidence also suggests that several dimensions of bureaucratic treatment (e.g., politeness, understanding) may be evaluated somewhat differently. In general and most important, these findings support the contention that at the interpersonal or "street-level" certain biases, perceived or real, may exist.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-187
Number of pages7
JournalThe Social Science Journal
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Citizen contacting and bureaucratic treatment-response in urban government : Some further evidence. / Hero, Rodney.

In: The Social Science Journal, Vol. 23, No. 2, 01.01.1986, p. 181-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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