Circuits kit K-12 Outreach: Impact of circuit element representation and student gender

Jana Reisslein, Gamze Ozogul, Amy Johnson, Kristen L. Bishop, Justin Harvey, Martin Reisslein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Outreach to K-12 schools is important for attracting students to electrical engineering. Circuits kits provide K-12 students hands-on interactions with electrical circuits. The goal of this experimental study was to investigate the effects of two types of electrical circuit element representations on the self-reported perceptions of the outreach activity and learning of elementary and high school students. In the abstract representation type, the circuit elements were marked with the standard engineering symbols. In the concrete representation type, the circuit elements, such as batteries and light bulbs, were familiar to the students. Perceived student enjoyment, understanding, and cognitive load were assessed through surveys. Student learning was measured with a post-test. The impacts of student gender and developmental level were also analyzed. Results indicate that for elementary school students, the concrete representation led to higher understanding ratings and lower cognitive load ratings than the abstract representation, while there was no difference in student learning between the two representation conditions. For high school students, there were no significant differences in student perceptions or learning between the two representation conditions. However, male high school students gave significantly higher interest and understanding ratings as well as lower cognitive load ratings than their female counterparts, even though there was no significant difference in student learning between the genders. Elementary school students reported higher enjoyment for the circuits kit activity and higher cognitive load than the high school students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6353606
Pages (from-to)316-321
Number of pages6
JournalIEEE Transactions on Education
Volume56
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Students
Networks (circuits)
gender
student
rating
school
learning
elementary school
Concretes
electrical engineering
Electrical engineering
self-image
symbol
engineering

Keywords

  • Circuit element representation
  • developmental level
  • electrical circuits kit
  • K-12 outreach student gender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Education

Cite this

Circuits kit K-12 Outreach : Impact of circuit element representation and student gender. / Reisslein, Jana; Ozogul, Gamze; Johnson, Amy; Bishop, Kristen L.; Harvey, Justin; Reisslein, Martin.

In: IEEE Transactions on Education, Vol. 56, No. 3, 6353606, 2013, p. 316-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reisslein, Jana ; Ozogul, Gamze ; Johnson, Amy ; Bishop, Kristen L. ; Harvey, Justin ; Reisslein, Martin. / Circuits kit K-12 Outreach : Impact of circuit element representation and student gender. In: IEEE Transactions on Education. 2013 ; Vol. 56, No. 3. pp. 316-321.
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