Circadian effects on simple components of complex task performance

Benjamin A. Clegg, Christopher D. Wickens, Alex Z. Vieane, Robert S. Gutzwiller, Angelia L. Sebok

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The goal of this study was to advance understanding and prediction of the impact of circadian rhythm on aspects of complex task performance during unexpected automation failures, and subsequent fault management. Participants trained on two tasks: a process control simulation, featuring automated support; and a multi-tasking platform. Participants then completed one task in a very early morning (circadian night) session, and the other during a late afternoon (circadian day) session. Small effects of time of day were seen on simple components of task performance, but impacts on more demanding components, such as those that occur following an automation failure, were muted relative to previous studies where circadian rhythm was compounded with sleep deprivation and fatigue. Circadian low participants engaged in compensatory strategies, rather than passively monitoring the automation. The findings and implications are discussed in the context of a model that includes the effects of sleep and fatigue factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages627-631
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289470
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: Oct 26 2015Oct 30 2015

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2015-January
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period10/26/1510/30/15

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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