Cigarette smoking and oral contraceptive use influence women's lipid, lipoprotein, and cardiovascular responses during stress.

M. C. Davis, K. A. Matthews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

Investigated the effects of behavioral stress and smoking cigarettes on the lipid, lipoprotein, neuroendocrine, and cardiovascular responses of female smokers who either used or did not use oral contraceptives (OC). Thirty-five healthy female smokers (20 of whom used OC) relaxed, smoked, or sham smoked and then prepared, delivered, and reviewed a speech presented in front of a video camera. Results show that behavioral stress increased total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, and free fatty acid levels, with significant increases in cholesterol, LDL-C, and free fatty acids apparent only among women who smoked during the session. In addition, OC users exhibited larger increases in triglyceride and blood pressure responses during stress than did nonusers whether or not they smoked during the protocol. Possible physiological mechanisms for each of the effects, as well as implications of the findings for understanding epidemiological associations among OC use, smoking, and coronary heart disease in women are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-736
Number of pages20
JournalHealth psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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