Children's Perceptions of Their Peer Experiences: Attributions, Loneliness, Social Anxiety, and Social Avoidance

Nicki R. Crick, Gary Ladd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

202 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, 338 3rd and 5th graders completed a sociometric questionnaire and 3 instruments designed to assess their feelings of loneliness, social anxiety, social avoidance, and their attributions for social outcomes. Results showed that children's feelings and attributions varied as a function of peer status, gender, and grade. For example, compared with peers, rejected children reported higher levels of loneliness and were more likely to attribute relationship failures to external causes. Children's feelings were also significantly related to their attributions about social events. Popular, average, and controversial status children who were socially distressed exhibited a non-self-serving attributional style, whereas distressed rejected children exhibited a self-serving attributional pattern. Neglected children who were distressed exhibited elements of both of these attributional styles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)244-254
Number of pages11
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume29
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Loneliness
attribution
Anxiety
anxiety
Emotions
experience
cause
questionnaire
event
gender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Life-span and Life-course Studies
  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Children's Perceptions of Their Peer Experiences : Attributions, Loneliness, Social Anxiety, and Social Avoidance. / Crick, Nicki R.; Ladd, Gary.

In: Developmental Psychology, Vol. 29, No. 2, 03.1993, p. 244-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f9ce0d888aeb48b6920607304424f597,
title = "Children's Perceptions of Their Peer Experiences: Attributions, Loneliness, Social Anxiety, and Social Avoidance",
abstract = "In this study, 338 3rd and 5th graders completed a sociometric questionnaire and 3 instruments designed to assess their feelings of loneliness, social anxiety, social avoidance, and their attributions for social outcomes. Results showed that children's feelings and attributions varied as a function of peer status, gender, and grade. For example, compared with peers, rejected children reported higher levels of loneliness and were more likely to attribute relationship failures to external causes. Children's feelings were also significantly related to their attributions about social events. Popular, average, and controversial status children who were socially distressed exhibited a non-self-serving attributional style, whereas distressed rejected children exhibited a self-serving attributional pattern. Neglected children who were distressed exhibited elements of both of these attributional styles.",
author = "Crick, {Nicki R.} and Gary Ladd",
year = "1993",
month = "3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "244--254",
journal = "Developmental Psychology",
issn = "0012-1649",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Children's Perceptions of Their Peer Experiences

T2 - Developmental Psychology

AU - Crick, Nicki R.

AU - Ladd, Gary

PY - 1993/3

Y1 - 1993/3

N2 - In this study, 338 3rd and 5th graders completed a sociometric questionnaire and 3 instruments designed to assess their feelings of loneliness, social anxiety, social avoidance, and their attributions for social outcomes. Results showed that children's feelings and attributions varied as a function of peer status, gender, and grade. For example, compared with peers, rejected children reported higher levels of loneliness and were more likely to attribute relationship failures to external causes. Children's feelings were also significantly related to their attributions about social events. Popular, average, and controversial status children who were socially distressed exhibited a non-self-serving attributional style, whereas distressed rejected children exhibited a self-serving attributional pattern. Neglected children who were distressed exhibited elements of both of these attributional styles.

AB - In this study, 338 3rd and 5th graders completed a sociometric questionnaire and 3 instruments designed to assess their feelings of loneliness, social anxiety, social avoidance, and their attributions for social outcomes. Results showed that children's feelings and attributions varied as a function of peer status, gender, and grade. For example, compared with peers, rejected children reported higher levels of loneliness and were more likely to attribute relationship failures to external causes. Children's feelings were also significantly related to their attributions about social events. Popular, average, and controversial status children who were socially distressed exhibited a non-self-serving attributional style, whereas distressed rejected children exhibited a self-serving attributional pattern. Neglected children who were distressed exhibited elements of both of these attributional styles.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=21144475253&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=21144475253&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 244

EP - 254

JO - Developmental Psychology

JF - Developmental Psychology

SN - 0012-1649

IS - 2

ER -