Children's Perceptions of the Outcomes of Social Strategies: Do the Ends Justify Being Mean?

Nicki R. Crick, Gary W. Ladd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

121 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two studies were conducted to examine the strategy outcome perceptions of popular, average, neglected, and rejected 3rd- and 5th-graders. In Study 1, children (n = 127) described the likely outcomes of 6 types of strategies (e.g., physical aggression, commands, compromise) in open-ended, hypothetical situation interviews. In Study 2 (n = 339), a questionnaire was used to assess children's outcome expectations and their evaluations of selected strategies. Findings indicate that children's outcome expectations and strategy evaluations vary as a function of peer status, age, and gender. Results from both studies are discussed in terms of an hypothesized relation between children's strategy outcome perceptions and their behavior in the peer group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)612-620
Number of pages9
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1990
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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