Children's ethno-aesthetic responses to a Turkish carpet

A cross-cultural study in three cultures

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Through exploratory art criticism, children learn to focus their vision, develop new viewpoints, and exchange ideas. I encouraged children in Turkey, Japan, and on the Navajo Reservation in Northeastern Arizona, United States to explore dimensions of my Turkish carpet. I discovered similarities and differences in their ethno-aesthetic responses, a group's beliefs and ideas on art and how and why they respond the way they do. The exercise in art criticism began with description, analysis and interpretation questions that served as a springboard for sharing technical information, symbolism, and cultural stories. The paper ends with generated insights not generalised conclusions about changing ethno-aesthetic meanings and values in traditional cultures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)320-331
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Art and Design Education
Volume20
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

art criticism
cultural studies
aesthetics
traditional culture
symbolism
Turkey
Japan
art
interpretation
Values
Group
Art Criticism
Cross-cultural Studies
Carpet
Aesthetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Education

Cite this

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